Review: DARK STAR by Alan Furst

Christopher from Doolittle’s read Alan Furst’s Dark Star for the WWII reading challenge.  Here’s an excerpt from his review:

I am beginning to become a serious fan of Furst’s work. Dark Star is definitely a darker work than the last Furst I read, The Polish Officer, and that really is saying something. I’m really not sure how accurately Furst portrays the thinking of a Soviet citizen living through Stalin’s purges, but it is certainly believable.

Read the full review here.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Reviews: THE SPIES OF WARSAW by Alan Furst

A couple of WWII challenge participants read Alan Furst’s The Spies of Warsaw.  Here’s what they had to say; click the links to read their complete reviews.

Sandy from You’ve GOTTA read this! says:

As any fan of WWII historical fiction would probably agree, I’ve had my share of concentration camps. For anyone interested in this time period, this book is an excellent diversion from the expected. Another angle, another perspective.

Anna from Diary of an Eccentric says:

While the scenes in which Mercier is under cover are exciting, The Spies of Warsaw is not all politics and war. Mercier falls in love with a League of Nations lawyer, Anna, so there’s some sex and romance thrown in, too.

Furst is a talented writer, and his use of description brilliantly sets the scene.

Also, check out Anna’s interview with Alan Furst on Examiner.com.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: THE POLISH OFFICER by Alan Furst

Christopher from Doolittle’s selected The Polish Officer by Alan Furst for the WWII reading challenge.  Here’s a little of what he had to say:

Furst’s style is the most noticeable part of his work. Many scenes feel more like an impressionist painting than a photograph of historical events. A times this works very well, as in a scene describing a duel between a British Beaufighter and German anti-aircraft gunners over a Belgian port. At other times it feels a bit overly lyrical, like the repeated invocation of the blue-painted streetlights of wartime Paris. On at least on occasion, I found myself completely lost as to the meaning of a scene because of Furst’s elliptical prose.

Read the rest of his review here.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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