Review: THE EVER-AFTER BIRD by Ann Rinaldi

Diary of an Eccentric reviewed The Ever-After Bird by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

I read The Ever-After Bird in just a couple of hours, and it blew me away.  Rinaldi based this book on Dr. Alexander Ross, a Canadian physician and renowned ornithologist who sketched birds on the Southern plantations and also was involved in the Underground Railroad.  Because little is known about Ross, much of The Ever-After Bird is fiction, but her version of the doctor is both charming and captivating.

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Review: COME JUNETEENTH by Ann Rinaldi

Diary of an Eccentric reviewed Come Juneteenth by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

Come Juneteenth is a fast-paced novel that grabbed my attention right from the start.  Why are Luli and Gabe making their way across the prairie in search of a young woman they both love?  Why did they have to conceal Sis Goose’s freedom, when she loved them and wasn’t likely to leave?  The answers to these questions pulled at my heart, and Rinaldi doesn’t pave the way for a happy ending this time…but that’s what makes this book so good.

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Review: SARAH’S GROUND by Ann Rinaldi

Diary of an Eccentric reviewed Sarah’s Ground by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

Mount Vernon, the Virginia plantation and family home of George Washington, was the only neutral ground during the American Civil War.  I had the pleasure of touring the home and the grounds more than a decade ago, so it was interesting to read about the home when it was being restored and war was being waged all around it.  Sarah’s Ground is based on the true story of Sarah Tracy, a young woman from New York who took a job at the estate as a caretaker of sorts.  Ann Rinaldi used historical information in Sarah’s letters to Miss Cunningham of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association in writing the book, but Rinaldi imagined much of Sarah’s story because her journals and other papers from her years at Mount Vernon were destroyed after the war when her home near Fairfax burned.

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Review: NUMBERING ALL THE BONES by Ann Rinaldi

Diary of Eccentric recently read and reviewed Numbering all the Bones by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge.  Here’s an excerpt:

Ann Rinaldi’s real purpose in Numbering All the Bones is to tell the story of the notorious Andersonville Prison camp, where 13,000 Yankee soldiers died from starvation, disease, and exposure in a little more than a year.  Eulinda witnesses the horrors of Andersonville first hand when she learns her older brother, Neddy, is being held there.  She sees the overcrowding, the lack of food, how the prisoners are left to fend for themselves when it comes to shelter, and how goods are smuggled in and sold to the prisoners who are desperate to survive.

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Review: MY VICKSBURG by Ann Rinaldi

Diary of an Eccentric reviewed My Vicksburg by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

My Vicksburg shows the hardships that the people endured during the siege, mainly how the Union won the town by essentially starving its people, and even while devising ways for the Corbets to be well fed, Rinaldi emphasizes how their neighbors weren’t so lucky.  She also shows how the war pitted loved ones against one another and forced people of all ages to make difficult decisions.  Moreover, Rinaldi doesn’t sugarcoat the trials and horrors of war, understanding that younger readers can handle such truths.

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Review: SARAH’S GROUND by Ann Rinaldi

Becky’s Book Reviews reviewed Sarah’s Ground by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

I thought the story was interesting. While I didn’t love this one, I was never bored by it. I may not think it the best book ever written about the Civil War, but I did think it worth the read. I learned a few things I didn’t know, for example. And so I would recommend it to fans of historical fiction, of the civil war era in particular.

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Review: AMELIA’S WAR by Ann Rinaldi

Diary of an Eccentric reviewed Amelia’s War by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

Rinaldi had me hooked from the first page.  She tends to write strong female characters who are flawed but have the right intentions, and that describes Amelia perfectly.  She’s got spunk, but she’s a little insecure about her place in the war.  And Rinaldi brings the Civil War to life, showing how chaotic it was to not know from one day to the next whether the town was under the control of the Union or the Confederacy and how neighbors turned on one another due to the politics of the war.  It’s hard for Amelia to ignore the war when the soldiers come marching in and gunfire and hand-to-hand combat occur in the town square; the war is literally on her doorstep.

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Review: GIRL IN BLUE by Ann Rinaldi

Silly Little Mischief reviewed Girl in Blue by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

This one was a little different than I thought it would be but good nonetheless. Sarah lives with an abusive father. She longs to find a way to leave her home. Upon hearing that the Union army is seeking more soldiers she devises a plan. She will dress like a boy and join the army. Sarah’s story was sad. I didn’t expect to be so sad. Sarah’s home life is miserable. So miserable that joining the army sounds like an escape. She endures so much and manages to keep pushing on even when things are at their worst.

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Review: JULIET’S MOON by Ann Rinaldi

Diary of an Eccentric reviewed Juliet’s Moon by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

Ann Rinaldi has reinforced my love of middle-grade historical fiction with Juliet’s Moon, a fictionalized account of Quantrill’s Raiders and the Grand Avenue prison collapse in Kansas City during the U.S. Civil War in 1863.  Rinaldi tells the story through the eyes of Juliet Bradshaw, a 12-year-old girl who in the prologue witnesses the Yankees burning down her family’s home and shooting her father dead.  The Bradshaw family is targeted by the Yankees because Juliet’s older brother, Seth, now her guardian, is a high-ranking member of a group of renegade Confederate bushwhackers led by William Clarke Quantrill.

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Review: COME JUNETEENTH by Ann Rinaldi

Becky’s Book Reviews reviewed Come Juneteenth by Ann Rinaldi for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

Secrets. Lies. Lives torn apart. Not by the Freedom War, the War Between the States, the Civil War. But by lies told during those years by masters to their slaves. Come Juneteenth is set in Texas in 1865. Texas slaveholders–like our heroine’s father–were able to keep Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation secret. For two years. Out of necessity? Out of greed? Out of fear? Out of hate or anger? Perhaps we’ll never know all the reasons.

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