Review: THE SANDCASTLE GIRLS by Chris Bohjalian

Book Snob has reviewed The Sandcastle Girls by Chris Bohjalian for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

Bohjalian has written a book that is difficult to read at times as he doesn’t hold back the horror of genocide during World War I.  His book is a necessary introduction to “The Slaughter you know next to nothing about.”  His characters are human, flawed, and believable.  The book is timely as the hundred year anniversary approaches but also because of the political unrest and problems gripping the people of Syria right now.

Read the full review.

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Review: THE SANDCASTLE GIRLS by Chris Bohjalian

Chaotic Compendiums recently read and reviewed The Sandcastle Girls by Chris Bohjalian for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s a sample:

There is a deeply personal element to this book – an Armenian-American author exploring the Armenian genocide during and after World War I (ain’t war grand).  During this time period the Ottoman empire exterminated between 1 and 1.5 million Armenians. It is considered one of the first modern (meaning 20th century) genocides and, in fact, the word genocide was coined to describe these events.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Reviews: SKELETONS AT THE FEAST by Chris Bohjalian

skeletons-at-the-feastA few participants reviewed Skeletons at the Feast by Chris Bohjalian for the WWII reading challenge.  Here are some excerpts; feel free to click the links to read the complete reviews.

Lezlie from Books ‘N Border Collies said:

Simply put, if this book doesn’t move you in some way, I’m pretty sure you have no heart at all.

Christina from Jackets & Covers said:

… [M]y greatest frustration stemmed from the abundance of holes in this novel; it could have used at least 100 more pages of narrative to cover the big chunks of time that went missing with each chapter.

Cheryl from Scrappy Cat said:

It was very thought provoking, raising such questions as how much did the average German citizen know about what the Nazis were doing and what could they have done about it.

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**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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