Review: NIGHT by Elie Wiesel

I recently reviewed Night by Elie Wiesel on Diary of an Eccentric for the WWII reading challenge.  Here’s an excerpt:

Wiesel’s recollections of his experiences during the Holocaust are vivid and haunting.  His words are heavy with darkness, desolation, and the loss of faith in the midst of evil.  Night is a book that stays with you long after you turn the last page with a heavy heart.  If you only read one Holocaust memoir in your lifetime, let it be this one.

Read the full review here.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: THE TOWN BEYOND THE WALL by Elie Wiesel

The Town Beyond the Wall by Elie Wiesel is another book read by Lorri from Jew Wishes that counts toward the WWII reading challenge.  Here is an excerpt from her review:

The Town Beyond the Wall is a study in suffering, and returning to the place where the suffering began. It is where it continues to keep its hold on you, due to many factors, both real and imagined. The novel questions whether you can return to where your life began, to where you spent the first youthful formative years of your life, to where your life as you knew it ended, and not feel some form of pain or suffering. To do so would be to blot out those who came before you.

Read the complete review here.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Reviews: DAY by Elie Wiesel

Day by Elie Wiesel is another WWII book that participants have read this year.

Check out the excerpt below and click on the link for a full review.

Books ‘N Border Collies said:

Day is much more subtle than the previous two books in this trilogy, Night and Dawn . In fact, it would be very easy to breeze through these 120 or so pages and end up wondering what the big deal is.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Reviews: NIGHT by Elie Wiesel

nightA few participants read and reviewed Night by Elie Wiesel for the WWII reading challenge.  Here are excerpts; feel free to click the links to read the complete reviews.

Joanna from It’s All About Me said:

One of the things that struck me is that even in times of war human beings don’t really entertain then thought that something bad could happen to them. The Jews in the village where the author lived had heard rumors about the atrocities going on in the camps and about persecution everywhere. They even had actual evidence because of one their own had been taken away and had escaped and come back to warn everyone. And yet they still believed that the war would end just in time or that the Germans would never get that far or that they would somehow be more merciful in their village. Amazing thing, the human mind.

Sandy from You’ve GOTTA Read This! said:

This is a very short book – only 120 pages – but took me days to read. I had to put it down often. The prose is direct and factual, and lacks any in-depth character development. Despite this, I’m left with echoes of a young Polish boy who played his beloved violin to his death. Of hundreds of cries and moans of distress from the train cars, “a death rattle of an entire convoy with the end approaching”. Of a commandant telling young Elie not to worry about his dying father, that it is “every man for himself” and there is “no such thing as a father, a brother or a friend”.

Sumthinblue from Bookmarked! said:

Despite the brevity of the book (less than a hundred pages, in short chapters), the few hours I read it felt like eternity because it elicited so many emotions in me — disbelief at the horror that was unfolding in the novel and double disbelief that it actually happened in this world, incredulity at the capability of humans to cause the suffering of fellow humans, compassion for the victims, and admiration for the fortitude and faith of those who survived (and even those who didn’t).

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**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Holocaust Remembrance Day

Today, Tuesday April 21, 2009, is Holocaust Remembrance Day when we remember the 6 million Jews slaughtered by the Nazi Regime under Hitler during World War II.

In Washington, D.C., today, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum will read aloud the names of the victims, and President Barack Obama will speak at the Capitol Rotunda on Thursday, April 23,  joined by Elie Wiesel, and recognize five Polish citizens who rescued Jews during the Holocaust.

Check out this Baltimore Sun Read Street Blog posting, here, about books to consider this Holocaust Remembrance Day.

To honor Holocaust Remembrance Day, the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum and research center will publish research regarding the killing fields across the former Soviet Union on its Web site.  The research–“The Untold Stories”–is ongoing and seeks to uncover the stories about the 1.5 million Jews that were killed there beginning in June 1941.  David Bankier, head of Yad Vashem’s International Institute for Holocaust Research, says, “This provides material for research on genocide elsewhere, like in Africa.”  Check out the rest of this story on the New York Times Web site, here.

On April 20, the Simon Wiesenthal Center issued a status report on investigations and prosecutions of Nazi war criminals.  This comes as the United States continues its efforts to deport John Demjanjuk, an 89-year-old man residing in Cleveland, Ohio, who denies ties to the Polish death camp Sobibor.

Today is a day to pause and remember those whose lives ended too soon at the hands of evil men.  It’s a time to reflect on the lessons we have learned and still need to learn as a human race.

Review: NIGHT by Elie Wiesel

nightwieselHeather from Book Addiction has posted a review of Night by Elie Wiesel.  Here’s a snippet:

For anyone not familiar with Night, this is Elie Wiesel’s memoir of his experiences in the Nazi death camps.  Wiesel and his family were living in Transylvania when the Nazis came to power, and although they were Jews, they never thought they would be too affected by what was going on around them.  Even when they were forced to live in the ghettos, the family kept a positive attitude.  But when Wiesel was a teenager, in late 1944, everyone in his ghetto was rounded up and taken to Auschwitz.

Read the complete review here.

ww2button20**Attention participants:  remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: DAWN by Elie Wiesel

dawnLezlie from Books ‘N Border Collies recently posted a review of Dawn by Elie Wiesel.  Here’s a snippet:

If you’ve read Wiesel’s Night, you know exactly how I feel right now and how hard it is to express what I’m thinking. While Dawn is not at all a happy book, it is not one of those books that left me depressed. It left me deeply introspective.

You can read the entire review here.

wwiibutton13**Attention participants:  remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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