Review: LAST POST by Ford Madox Ford

Matt’s Book Blog recently read and reviewed Last Post by Ford Madox Ford for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s a sample:

Ford seems to be saying by the end of the war the values of the elite class have been destroyed or made meaningless. There be Tory English monsters in Last Post. General Campion, although Christopehr Tietjens’ own godfather, believed Sylvia’s lies and sent Christopher to the front. Also returning is the vindictive gossip Ruggles, who worked as one of Sylvia’s minions. Afraid that Christopher will ask for debts to be repaid, Edith Ethel Duchemin scandalizes his name. As if local people were not “beastly” (a key word in the novel) enough, we meet the new-rich American Mrs. de Bray Pape, who is so deluded and conceited that she believes she is the reincarnation of Louis XIV’s consort.

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Review: A MAN COULD STAND UP by Ford Madox Ford

Matt’s Book Blog recently read and reviewed A Man Could Stand Up by Ford Madox Ford for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

This is the third novel in the Parade’s End tetralogy, which Anthony Burgess called “the finest novel about the First World War.” The title echoes a remark made by a squaddie (grunt) that once peace finally comes, a man could stand up on a hill without the risk of anybody taking shots at him.

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Review: NO MORE PARADES by Ford Madox Ford

Matt’s Book Blog recently read and reviewed No More Parades by Ford Madox Ford for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s a sample:

Although there is no mud and blood, Ford evokes the horror of combat with the death of the soldier ‘09 Morgan, who dies cradled in Tietjens’ arms. When awfulness becomes the new normal and is prolonged, it is no wonder that officers lose their minds, as the mad subordinate McKechnie shows.

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**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: SOME DO NOT by Ford Madox Ford

Matt’s Book Blog recently read and reviewed Some Do Not by Ford Madox Ford for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s a sample:

Ford’s modernist prose and technique are difficult. He uses paradox, time shifts, and, quoting the man himself, “the intricate tangle of references and cross-references.” His fiction rewards especially attentive readers who re-read. Other writers like Siegfried Sasson seemed to mourn that The First World War exploded traditional social and cultural truths of Europe but Ford’s thesis is that the war was the inevitable outcome of social tensions, abuse of power, madness, cruelty and violence. Ford truly was what he thought a serious novelist should be, a historian of his time.

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**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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