Review: MARCH by Geraldine Brooks

Bookworm’s Dinner reviewed March by Geraldine Brooks for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

My expectations as I began to read MARCH were high and as soon as I read the first few pages I knew this was another extraordinary novel by this author.

Alcott’s widely cherished classic, LITTLE WOMEN lends Geraldine Brooks the character of Mr. March, father and husband who was an absent father in Alcott’s story. Brooks styles an imaginative interpretation of his life as a young boy and later when he is marries  Marmee and they have a family of four girls.  Readers will recognize the scenes of Alcott’s story that are threaded in the plot as well as major historical events like Harpers’ Ferry and the clandestine efforts of the Underground Railroad. Brooks’ research and examination of diaries and other primary sources, provided a palette of the past that emerges in the scenes depicting chilling episodes surrounding the brutality of slave life, the primitive medical care and unsanitary conditions on and off the battlefield and how the Civil War altered all families lives forever.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Another Review of MARCH by Geraldine Brooks

Some participants do not have blogs of their own, but we like to give them an opportunity to express their opinions about the books they read for the reading challenges.

Reva read March by Geraldine Brooks for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here is her review:

GB fills in the blanks left by “Little Women” as she creates the story of their father who goes off to serve as chaplin for the soldiers as they suffer losses at Ball’s Bluff and enter makeshift hospitals that have little to offer, except amputation.

One chapter I especially enjoyed featured a group of ex-slaves who have followed the army of Yanks in hopes of freedom, but with no plan or destination ahead. March, another officer and the negroes attempt to farm cotton on leased land between battles with the horrors of Confederate raiding parties, disease and lack of experience or know-how. If I had to describe “March” in three works, I would offer: action, tragedy and renewal.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: MARCH by Geraldine Brooks

Scrappy Cat read and reviewed March by Geraldine Brooks for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

This is the story of Mr. March, the father in Little Women, who was a chaplain for the North during the Civil War.  He was a very idealistic man, and went to war to support his anti-slavery convictions.  Once he got to war, he became disillusioned, not about the cause, but about how blurred the lines were between right and wrong, good and evil.  I enjoyed this book much more than Little Women, in large part because the characters felt more real to me (ie, not perfect but flawed, with real feelings and emotions).

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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