Review: ALL OUR WORLDLY GOODS by Irene Nemirovsky

Impressions in Ink recently read and reviewed All Our Worldly Goods by Irene Nemirovsky for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

I loved this book and was quickly swept away by this story. I could easily relate to Agnes and Pierre’s marriage beginnings, the depth of love they had for each other, the growing realizations of the transformation in their marriage, the quickness of time, and the anxieties over children and the choices they’d made. My curiosity was satisfied in what life was like for French citizens during World War I, the aftermath of the “Great War,” and then World War II.

Read the full review.
Becky’s Book Reviews recently read and reviewed this book as well.  Here’s a bit of what she had to say:

What All Our Worldly Goods lacks in characterization, it more than makes up for in beautiful writing. Nemirovsky’s novel has great atmosphere: a rich, detailed setting. The characters are more simple than complex human beings, but, I think there are enough presented to get a flavor of what life was like across the generations in the troubled decades between the start of World War I and the beginning of World War II. They’re more sketched than developed.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: WOMAN OF LETTERS: IRENE NEMIROVSKY AND SUITE FRANCAISE

Lorri from Jew Wishes recently reviewed Woman of Letters: Irene Nemirovsky and Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky and edited by Oliver Corpet and Garrett White.  Here’s an excerpt:

It is a must-have book if you are a reader of Irene Nemirovsky’s work. Even if you aren’t, you will gain historical knowledge from this compilation. It is a fascinating look at the life and times of a courageous woman, a woman who was a mother, wife, daughter and author, a woman who died of typhus in Auschwitz. It’s historical merits are invaluable. That she was able to have the stamina and courage to pen Suite Francaise is amazing, in itself, under the extreme circumstances that surrounded her. I highly recommend this poignant and brilliant book to everyone. It is a testament to her courage and struggles as an author, during extreme adverse moments in time.

Read the full review here.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: SUITE FRANCAISE by Irene Nemirovsky

Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky is another book selected by WWII reading challenge participants.  Here are excerpts from a couple participants; click the links to read their complete thoughts.

It’s All About Me said:

This wasn’t a page-turner and I found some sections difficult to get through. But it’s a book worth reading because it shows part of history and it does so in a beautiful and human way.

A Reading Collection said:

If you’re a die hard fan of WWII- related books like me, do not miss this book.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: SUITE FRANCAISE by Irene Nemirovsky

suite-francaise2

Sandy from You’ve GOTTA read this! recently posted a review of Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky.  Here’s a snippet:

Suite Francaise is one of those rare books where I actually experienced trepidation in reviewing it. I’m not really sure my pedestrian use of the English language can do it justice. A friend of mine, John Cole, very highly recommended it to me, knowing my interest in WWII stories are above the norm. (My husband was raised in Communist Poland, and his parents and grandparents were intimately involved with the Solidarity movement, WWII and WWI.) But this isn’t just a book about WWII. It probably was THE first book about WWII.

You can read the entire review here.

ww2button13**Attention participants:  remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: SUITE FRANCAISE by Irene Nemirovsky

suite-francaiseCarol from Magistra Mater recently posted a review of Suite Francasise by Irene Nemirovsky.  Here’s a snippet:

Irène Némirovsky’s tragic story makes this a bittersweet read.  She lived through the German invasion and occupation of France, writing these two novellas as the events were current. She died in Auschwitz in 1942.  Her daughters rescued her manuscript and left it, untouched,  in a suitcase for 60+ years.  The English translation was published in 2006.  This is very likely the first WWII fiction written.

Read the entire review here.

ww2button5**Attention participants:  remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post it here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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