Review: PARDONABLE LIES by Jacqueline Winspear

Bitter Tea and Mystery recently read and reviewed Pardonable Lies by Jacqueline Winspear for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

I find the portrayal of London, rural England, and other parts of Europe during the years following World War I to be interesting and well done. Maisie was a nurse during the war and suffered losses and experienced traumas that continue to haunt her. Almost everyone that Maisie encounters has been affected by the war.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: BIRDS OF A FEATHER by Jacqueline Winspear

Bitter Tea and Mystery recently read and reviewed Birds of a Feather by Jacqueline Winspear for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

I read Birds of a Feather recently, and I did like the historical setting. The book is very successful at bringing alive the problems people are left to deal with after the Great War.  Most people have lost relatives and friends. Men have come home from war with injuries that plague them for the rest of their years. Times are hard for most people, and there is a lot of unemployment.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Reviews: A LESSON IN SECRETS by Jacqueline Winspear

A couple of WWI Reading Challenge participants read and reviewed A Lesson in Secrets.  Here are excerpts from their reviews; click the links to read the full reviews.

Diary of an Eccentric said:

Maisie thinks emerging support for the Nazis in England is a concern, though she is dismissed by her superiors.  Of course, we know Maisie has cause for concern, and I hope this is all revealed in future books in the series.  I also was captivated by the connections to World War I through a seemingly simple children’s book.  Winspear provides much food for thought about pacifism, the treatment of conscientious objectors during the war when everyone was geared up to fight, and how people who had seen the outcome of the war could ignore what was going on in Germany in 1932.

Savvy Verse & Wit said:

Winspear crafts an intricate novel of mystery that resonates with the reader as Dobbs is a strong woman making her way in a man’s world just after the war has ended and women are struggling to maintain their new found freedom.  Dobbs is a strong woman, though scarred, who is intelligent and observant.  Interestingly, Winspear demonstrates how idle gossip can provide just the nugget of information investigators need to close in on a killer.  While Dobbs is kept in the dark about the knowledge held by government officials, she manages to uncover their secrets and those of other government officials who view her as an inconsequential lecturer.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: MAISIE DOBBS by Jacqueline Winspear

Beauty is a Sleeping Cat recently read and reviewed Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

Maisie’s life story, the crime and its solution are all rooted in WWI. While I didn’t think the crime was gripping I thought the way the book revealed what happened to Maisie during the war was suspenseful. I truly admired the way it managed to convey an idea of WWI. Maisie and many other characters still suffer from various ailments or traumas.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: THE MAPPING OF LOVE AND DEATH by Jacqueline Winspear

Tutu’s Two Cents recently read and reviewed The Mapping of Love and Death by Jacqueline Winspear for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

The post-mortem shows that Michael may not have died from enemy fire, and Maisie sets out to find the truth.  In her delving into this mystery, we are introduced into the role of the Army cartographers, a subject I found quite interesting.  It added another bit of information and filtering to use in my World War I reading.

Read the full review, which also includes thoughts on Messenger of Truth by Jacqueline Winspear.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: BIRDS OF A FEATHER by Jacqueline Winspear

The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader recently read and reviewed Birds of a Feather by Jacqueline Winspear for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

Once again, the lasting effects of World War I play a huge part in the storyline, and for me that is one of the biggest pluses to reading this series. It is often easy to think that World War I went from 1914 to 1918, and then the Great Depression went from the late 1920s, and then World War II started in 1939 and that they were almost standalone events. The reality is though that many of the people who were affected by the first war were affected by the Depression and were again affected by the second war, and so they are indelibly linked in the lives of these people.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: AMONG THE MAD by Jacqueline Winspear

Kim from Page After Page reviewed Among the Mad by Jacqueline Winspear for the WWII reading challenge.  Here’s what she had to say about the 6th book in the Maisie Dobbs series:

These are not light and fluffy though–they deal with the reality of the commoner in Britain between the world wars–focusing especially on the poor treatment and plight of the WWI veteran.

Read the entire review here.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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