Review: THE FIRST WORLD WAR by John Keegan

Howling Frog Books recently read and reviewed The First World War by John Keegan for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s a sample:

John Keegan’s book is an overview of the entire war.  It can’t get into details or personal stories much; the perspective is from the heights.  I found it difficult to get into for this reason, though it’s not a flaw in the book–that’s just how it has to be in order to get the story told.  Still, it’s a dense book about war tactics, which is never easy for me to read.

Read the full review.

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Review: THE FIRST WORLD WAR by John Keegan

Matt’s Book Blog recently read and reviewed The First World War by John Keegan for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

But I think Keegan, perhaps the most famous military historian still alive and working, writes about the war clearly and accurately in only about 400 pages. The book is written concisely, with clear chronological organization. He covers the different places the war was fought, even Africa. He judiciously quotes from diaries and letters the experience of foot-soldier, provides insight into the generals’ way of thinking, and gives a succinct valuation of politician PM David Lloyd-George.

Read the full review.

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Review: THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR by John Keegan

Chèli’s Shelves reviewed The American Civil War:  A Military History by John Keegan for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011. Here’s an excerpt:

In the past 18 months I have ready numerous books on the Civil War – mainly non-military – so I picked up this book to fill in all those blanks that were still empty. A few facts I hadn’t gathered from other books were:

  • recent developments of the time in food preservation, especially canning led to the Union soldiers being best fed military force on record up to that point in time.
  • Southern strategy was to deny access to union invaders. This was a major difficulty with such a large perimeter to defend.
  • At Antietam, McClellan did not use all the forces at his disposal. He also lacked the killer instinct and refused to augment hatreds by confiscating property, living off the land, or freeing slaves.
  • inadequacy of the southern railroads with their non-strategic routes hampered the Union efforts after their invasion

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR by John Keegan

2606 Books and counting… read and reviewed The American Civil War by John Keegan for the U.S. Civil War Reading Challenge 2011.  Here’s an excerpt:

Where Keegan is excellent is in the insights he brings to the war.  He is able to use the breadth of his historical knowledge to draw comparisons with other conflicts ranging from the Napoleonic Wars through to Vietnam.  He also emphasises the degree to which the war was dictated by the physical geography of the theatre of war.  Not only did this drive the strategy of both sides but it also impacted upon individual tactics and was a key factor in the number of casualties.  Keegan highlights Grant’s ability to deal with the topography of the battleground as one of his leading qualities.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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