Review: LADY ALMINA AND THE REAL DOWNTON ABBEY by The Countess of Carnarvon

Writing Wrongs reviewed Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey by The Countess of Carnarvon for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

The narrative is fairly scandal free, the author glossing over the fact Lady Almina remarries in the same year Lord Carnarvon dies and only briefly mentions the court case she becomes involved in (see Wikipedia for more info).

However, I did enjoy learning more about what went into running a private hospital during WWI and the problems encountered.

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Review: LADY ALMINA AND THE REAL DOWNTON ABBEY by the Countess of Carnarvon

Seven Apples recently reviewed Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey by the Countess of Carnarvon for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

The author also covers the actual events of World War I, using both the experiences of the soldiers turned Highclere patients (her description of David Campbell’s experiences at Gallipoli was particularly harrowing) and the experiences of the Carnarvon family (Aubrey Herbert, her husband’s younger half-brother, played an important diplomatic role). This part is clearly well-researched and the descriptions are extremely powerful.

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Review: LADY ALMINA AND THE REAL DOWNTON ABBEY by The Countess of Carnarvon

Impressions In Ink recently read and reviewed Lady Almina and the Real Downtown Abbey by The Countess of Carnarvon for the WWI Reading Challenge in 2012.  Here’s an excerpt:

There were two additional points in this book that I was pleasantly happy to read about:
1. Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter’s discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt.
2. Extensive World War I history, including Lady Almina’s nursing work during this period.

Read the full review.

**Attention participants: Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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