Favorite WWII Books: Ours and Yours

We thought it would be fun to share some of our favorite WWII books in case anyone needs some recommendations for the 2017 reading challenge. We’d also love for you to share some of your favorites in the comments to give us some ideas for our own reading!

It was really hard to pare down our lists, so we’ve chosen 5 individual favorites, and 5 books that we both read and loved.

Our shared favorites, in no particular order:

a-moment-forever

Anna’s review

Serena’s review

the-bakers-daughter

Anna’s review

Serena’s review

the-race-for-paris

Anna’s review

Serena’s review

guernsey

Anna’s review

Serena’s review

the-sea-garden

Anna’s review

Serena’s review

******

Anna’s favorites, in no particular order

(click the cover to read her review)

the-book-thief

code-name-verity

the-plum-tree

every-man-dies-alone

shadows-walking

******

Serena’s favorites, in no particular order

(click cover to read her review)

secretofmagic

monumentsmen

grandcentral

tallgrass

womenvalor

******

We hope you’ll consider reading some of our favorites for the challenge. Please share your recommendations in the comments!

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Reviews: THE BOOK THIEF by Markus Zusak

Here are the latest participant reviews of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, another popular selection for the WWII reading challenge.  Just click the links to read the complete reviews.

JaneFan from The Bookworm’s Hideout says:

Books play such a role in this novel. At first they are coveted (sometime forbidden) objects. They create a connection between Liesel and her new father, Liesel and the mayor’s wife. They are by turns the enemy, a receptacle, a blank slate, a memento, an escape. They are impermanent. They are immortal.

At a deeper level, this novel is about the power of words both to save and destroy. Some would say WWII was started with words, fed with words. But words can also rebel. Words can heal. There is beauty, even within brutality. This novel is, if nothing else a great reminder of the power of words and the importance (and fragility) of our freedom to read anything anytime anywhere.

Literary Feline from Musings of a Bookish Kitty says:

The writing is beautiful, almost poetic. There is a certain rhythm to Death’s narration. The book may be long but I savored every word.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Reviews: THE BOOK THIEF by Markus Zusak

Another popular book among WWII reading challenge participants is The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  Here is the latest round of reviews; click the links to read the entire review.

J.T. Oldfield from Bibliofreak says:

…really, the whole book is beautiful.  Sad, but beautiful.  I didn’t cry like I thought I would at the end.  My eyes teared up a bit, but that was it.  This is probably because the narrator had already prepared us for the end, by telling it flat out half way through the book.  Maybe that is part of why this is a good YA book–it’s sort of a prepared sorrow.

Mel from The Reading Life says:

“The Book Thief” shows us a lot about the reading life, how a love and obsession with reading effects the main Character Leisel and those around her. There is an old saying about deep books-“The book reads you at the same time you read it”. The narrator of the book is Death. This is a daring conceit pulled off perfectly. I even came to Like Death and felt in sympathy with him at times. The book is told in a time and place of great evil. You know it is there, you cant forget it but it does not get in the way.

**Attention participants:  Remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Reviews: THE BOOK THIEF by Markus Zusak

book thiefYet another popular book among participants is The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  Here are some excerpts [click their links to read their full reviews]:

Nise’ from Under The Boardwalk says:

I had to get used to the writing style, but once I did, I could not put it down. It is a young adult book, but adults will love it as well.

Christina from Jackets & Covers says:

I have to say, telling a story set in Nazi Germany from the point of view of death is pretty ingenious.  I didn’t know that before I started — it took me a moment to realize who exactly the narrator was — and it almost turned me off to the book because, honestly, a book about Nazi Germany from death’s point of view is morbid, twisted, and…ingenious.

thekoolaidmom from In the Shadow of Mt. TBR says:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak is haunting and breath-taking, poetically beautiful and filled with truth.

Shelley from ChainReading says:

It takes a little while to get used to the rhythm of the writing and to get used to the narration by death, but KEEP GOING. It will all be worth it.

Julie from Jules’ Book Reviews says:

The writing style was fairly standard, but because of how the narrator (death) told the story, it drew you into the book, and was also able to have you really invested in it. It also had a lot of symbolism and interesting points on humanity, that “death” points out, which I found to be very interesting and had beautiful meanings behind them, that really made the story, and its characters become very real. One part in the end had me in tears, and some emotions behind acts had me close to tears at other times.

Arielle from Bookatopia says:

The first thing I have to say about this book is WOW. It is one of those books that you really get into and the characters become part of you, it is a truly moving story. For a book to be added to my favorites list it has to leave me thinking about it even when I’m not reading it, few books do that but this is definitely one of them.

Hilarie from Never Not Reading says:

I fell hard for almost each and every character in this book. I actually found myself wiping away a few tears as I finished the last few pages. I’ve been reading a lot of great books lately, but this one really stands out as an amazing read.


warthrugen_button2

**Attention participants:  remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: THE BOOK THIEF by Markus Zusak

book-thief1Purplemoonmyst from Adventures in Never-Never Land recently posted a review of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  Here’s a snippet:

The story is a girl who is placed with foster parents in Nazi Germany. At first she did not go to school much so when she was placed she could not really read. As time goes on she gets the power of words and then she starts stealing books. The symbolism being that Hitler waged a war with words so she fights back with her own.

You can read the entire review here.

ww2button16**Attention participants:  remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

Review: THE BOOK THIEF by Markus Zusak

book-thiefMichele from A Reader’s Respite recently posted a review of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  Here’s a snippet:

It’s a simple story, really. A young German girl named Liesel is delivered to foster parents in a small town outside of Munich while Hitler rises to power. Her life is changed forever when her family hides a Jew in their basement.

The beauty of this story lies in it’s simplicity.

You can read the entire review here.

wwiibutton5**Attention participants:  remember to email us a link to your reviews, and we’ll post them here so we can see what everyone is reading!**

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